Salem Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) Welcomes You!

We are so happy that your student will be joining us for breakfast and lunch in our cafeterias and classrooms every day.

The Salem Food and Nutrition Service seeks to inspire students to love healthy foods and learn to recognize and choose well-balanced meals so they will develop healthy habits for life. When students start the day with a healthy meal, they are more likely to retain what they learn in class, behave better, and experience better health outcomes. Today’s healthy and well-educated students will be our striving and strong community tomorrow. We care deeply about the well-being of every student. We put our hearts into everything we do, from cooking all our meals from scratch to educating kids about healthy eating. We source as much of our food as possible from local farms, and we process all the raw ingredients ourselves.

About Us

Who We Are

Our team consists of hard working, dedicated staff members that are passionate about serving nutritious, and delicious meals to our students so that they can thrive in and out of the classroom. 

What We Do

The Food and Nutrition Services team operates in 8 of our school sites, and servicing all 11 schools throughout the district.  We are committed to serving scratch cooked, fresh nutritious meals every day to every student. To the extent that we can, we source our ingredients from local vendors to ensure the freshest food possible. Breakfast and Lunch is provided at no cost to every student. At most sites, breakfast is provided in the classroom or at a grab and go station at the entrance to ensure all students have access to a healthy start.

Summer Eats

Our Summer Eats Program is currently active! Kids and teens under 18 eat FREE all summer long. 2 new locations started serving food on July 25th at Salem Heights (12 Pope Street) and Loring Towers (1000 Loring Ave). Check out our weekly menu below and find a location near you!

Frequently Asked Questions

Salem is a CEP (Community Eligibility Provision) school district. What is CEP?

The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) is a meal service option for schools and school districts in low-income areas.  CEP allows the Salem School district to serve breakfast and lunch at no cost to all enrolled students without collecting household applications.

CEP is a meal service authorized under the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act (HHFKA). Our meals are at no charge for all students because we know that good nutrition helps students’ attendance, behavior, and academic achievement.

What are the basic meal requirements?

The National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program requirements are designed to provide age-appropriate meals to specific age/grade groups. For grades K-12, school breakfast and lunch  are also limited in sodium, calories, saturated fats, and trans fats to reduce the risk of chronic diseases.

The School Breakfast Program requires three food components, each with daily and weekly minimums including:

  • Fruits (vegetables may be offered in place of fruit)
  • Grains (meats/meat Alternates may be offered in place of grains)
  • Milk

The NSLP requires five food components, each with daily and weekly minimum (below), including:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables (including a grades K-12 weekly requirement for vegetable variety with minimum requirements for each of the 5 vegetable subgroups, including dark green, red/orange, beans/peas (legumes), starchy, and “other” vegetables)
  • Grains
  • Meats/meat alternates
  • Milk

What if my child has a disability? Are schools required to make menu substitutions for children who cannot eat the regular lunch or breakfast?

Federal law and the regulations for the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program require schools to make accommodations for children who are unable to eat the school meal as prepared because of a disability. Meal modifications may include offering an alternative to a food that a child is allergic to, altering the consistency of a food component to facilitate feeding, or supporting the child during the meal service so they may participate in the meal.

In order to make substitutions, the school must have a written statement signed by a licensed physician indicating what the child’s disability is, what foods must be omitted from the child’s diet, and what foods must be substituted.

What if my child has a food allergy?

Health and safety are our top priorities. Our kitchen managers and staff are trained in preventing food allergies and cross-contact contamination. Our kitchens and meals are peanut- and tree nut-free. Access to our kitchens and food storage is highly secured to ensure food safety and allergen control.

If your child has a food allergy, please work with your school’s nurse to document the allergy.


Programs

School Breakfast Program

The School Breakfast Program (SBP) is a federally-assisted meal program operating in public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. The SBP started in 1966 as a pilot project, and was made a permanent entitlement program by Congress in 1975. School districts and independent schools that choose to participate in the Program must serve breakfast meals meeting Federal nutrition requirements. School breakfast must meet the applicable recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and are designed to ensure that students enter the classroom well-nourished and ready to learn.

National School Lunch Program

The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to children each school day.

Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) is a federally assisted program providing free fresh fruits
and vegetables to children at eligible elementary schools during the school day. The goal of the FFVP is to introduce children to fresh fruits and vegetables, to include new and different varieties, and to increase
overall acceptance and consumption of fresh, unprocessed produce among children. The FFVP also encourages healthier school environments by promoting
nutrition education. To learn more, visit the FFVP webpage: https://www.fns.usda.gov/ffvp/fresh-fruit-
and-vegetable-program.

After School Snack Program

The afterschool snack component of the National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted snack service that fills the afternoon hunger gap for school children. The snack service is administered at the Federal level by USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service. At the state level, it is administered by state agencies, which operate the snack service through agreements with local school food authorities (SFAs). SFAs are ultimately responsible for the administration of the snack service.

Summer Food Service Program (Summer Eats)

Summer Eats is a totally free-of-charge program that provides free meals to all kids and teens, ages 18 and under, at locations all across Massachusetts during the summer months.

Careers

SPS Food and Nutrition Services is currently hiring! Come Work with us. The following positions are currently open:

Cafeteria Helpers – $18.16/Hour, 3, 4 and 6 hour shifts

Head Cooks – $25.72/Hour, 4 and 6 hour shifts

Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma (or equivalent) Ability to lift a minimum of 30 pounds Enjoy working with children Good organizational and communication skills Sense of pride in serving healthy, nutritious meals

How to Apply Visit https://salem.tedk12.com/hire or call 978-740-1230

Salem Public Schools is an Equal Opportunity Employer

For more information, contact:
Point of Contact:  Irvelt Perrin, Director of Food and Nutrition Services
Located at: Salem High School — 77 Willson Street, Salem, MA, 01970 
Telephone Number: (978)-740-1230
Email Address: iperrin@salemk12.org

USDA NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.